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How to Speak Outlander Lesson 12: Tha Gaol Agam Ort, Cape Breton and the Giveaway

With anticipation of the Outlander premier episode on August 9th reaching fever pitch, I have only just now realized that the series beginning will also mark the end of some of our beloved pre-show traditions. Starz has called this to our attention with the release of the final ‘How to Speak Outlander’ video. However, if this series of videos featuring Àdhamh, Sam and others has to end, what a way to go out! I predict the ringtones and notifications of Outlanders worldwide are changing right now.

How to Speak Outlander Lesson 12: Tha Gaol Agam Ort

Wow! As final episodes go, this one is a keeper. Who among us hasn’t wanted to hear ‘my love is upon you’ from Jamie Fraser?  I think Sam must have a secret though, there’s a definite gleam in his eye at the end of this video. I wonder how long he’ll keep it? Until August 9th maybe?

Meanwhile in Cape Breton…

I have been having tons of fun in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. So far I have attended a Celtic square dance and made a visit to the Highland Village museum at Iona.  I promise that I am working on a blog post that will even have videos, but I have to find some better Internet connectivity before I can upload them! In the meantime, here are some quick pictures to tide you over.

And don’t forget…

Only 4 more days to enter the first ever GreatScot! giveaway. Click here to enter!

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What’s in a Name? Gaelic vs Gàidhlig in the Outlander World

So as we roll into summer, we’re only 47 days away from the premiere episode of Outlander. (Unless you’re lucky enough to win one of the coveted invitations to the July 25 Gala premiere or July 30 Time Warner Cable preview. Anybody need a +1?) As existing Outlander fans though, we need to be prepared for the multitude of questions that will come our way as the rest of the world falls for Outlander.

One question I’ve had, and that I’ve heard others ask as well, is ‘what is the difference between the pronunciation of Gaelic and Gàidhlig?’

Well, what better source for a definitive answer than Outlander’s own Gàidhlig expert and tutor, Àdhamh Ó Broin? Here is what Àdhamh has to say on the subject:

What is the correct pronunciation of “Gaelic”? “The correct pronunciation is actually exactly as it looks. In the language itself, the word most commonly encountered is Gàidhlig /GAAHLeek/ (although in parts of Argyll, it is more like /GELLeek/ ‘e’ as in “get”) and this has meant that many people now say /Gahlick/ in Eng. But in truth this is more like a nickname for the language than a proper name. Scottish, Irish and Manx (the Isle of Man) are in fact all Gaelic -like “gay” & “lick” stuck together. This a language family, of Gaelic or Goidelic languages, not one particular language. The correct historical terms in English for the three sister tongues within this are exactly as above: Scottish, Irish and Manx. In fact, out of the six Celtic languages, only Scottish has ceased to be referred to by its historical national title, which is a matter of some regret, as it is the only language prior to the arrival of English ever to have been spoken throughout the country and its culture gave us most everything -from kilts, to pipes, to black pudding- we now associate with Scottishness. Another point to address would be the myth that has been floating about that Irish is /GAELik/ & Scottish is /GAHLik/ but if this were true, then the Scots who speak the language would be referred to as Gahls rather than Gaels which we know is not the case.

So which one to use? In Outlander, we have stuck with /GAHLik/ because this is the preferred term of the majority of Scottish speakers. There is no point in confusing matters for the sake of it. But were you to ask me my preferred pronunciation? That would be just as it looks and how it is pronounced in Nova Scotia to this day, /GAELik/!”

So there we have it. Originally there was probably no difference in the pronunciation of the two terms but for most of today’s Scots, and in Outlander, /GAHLik/ is the preferred pronunciation.

So as an added bonus, here is a picture that Àdhamh posted on his Facebook page this weekend.

CLACH NA CAILLICHE
The Witch’s Stone
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This stone was a boundary marker between Gleann Dà Ruadhail (glen of two red streams) and Srath Lachainn (Lachlan’s valley) parishes in my home district of Cowal, Argyll

The “cailleach” associated with this stone was believed to be able to change shape to become a cow and return to human form.
An excavation has just been completed on the other side of the modern road that now intersects the area and they found an old inn where the drovers would drink their fill and sleep over for the night.
The glen is almost devoid of human activity now, save for the whoosh of the odd passing car moving between the two parishes…

 

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How to Speak Outlander Catch-up and Gàidhlig Tip of the Day from Àdhamh

Due to real life and other occurrences (i.e. Outlander Retreat and MOBY), I’m a bit behind on the How to Speak Outlander posts from Starz. For those who may have missed it, or just want an excuse to watch again, here are the latest in the ‘How to Speak Outlander’ series.

How to Speak Outlander: Lesson 10 – Dinna Fash

This is probably one of my favorite Scots phrases and I always enjoy seeing Mrs. Fitz. It’s also lovely to see Àdhamh continue to allow his personality to shine through. :-)

 

How to Speak Outlander: Lesson 11 – Slàinte Mhath

Now here is a phrase every good whisky-drinking Outlander should know! Alas, I have it on good authority that Àdhamh was forced to drink water during the filming of this video. Afraid of having too many takes to get the perfect video, you ken.

 

Gàidhlig Tips from Àdhamh

Last but not least. Àdhamh was in a particularly teacherly frame of mind yesterday and provided us with the following Gàidhlig tip of the day:

Next to slender vowels, d, s & t become soft -see below….

‘D’ –  “deur” /jair/ (tear) : “dìolt” /jeelt/ (refuse; ‘jilt’)

‘S’ –  “seud” /shade/ (jewel) : “sìol” /sheel/ (seed, progeny)

‘T’ –  “teth” /tchay/ (hot) : “tinn” /tcheen/ (ill)

 

 

 

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The Outlander Effect or (in Gàidhlig) “Buaidh Outlander”

 Outlander and Scottish tourism

Now that a premiere date for Outlander has been announced, we are slowly yet surely seeing press coverage about the series tick up. One such article published recently got me to thinking. Outlander already has a large and loyal fan base. What impact has there been, if any, on Scotland’s economy and culture? And what can we expect to change after the series starts airing?

First, let me start with the article that intrigued me, published by a site called “We Love Soaps, who bill themselves as the “World’s biggest champion of scripted, serialized storytelling on TV & the web.” I guess the Outlander TV series does fit that description, although I would never call it a Soap! The bit of the article to catch my eye was this:

The fervent on-line fan base totals over a half-million and when the ‘first-look’ photo of Sam Heughan as Jamie Fraser posted on the Starz social channels, it outperformed other introductions of lead characters for properties such as The Great Gatsby (Gatsby), Hunger Games (Katniss), Game of Thrones (Ned Stark), and NBC’s Dracula (Dracula). Additionally, when Sam was cast as Jamie Fraser, the fans took it upon themselves to make their voices heard and put him on E! News’ “Hottie of the Week” charts two weeks in a row (which is very rare, if not unprecedented). In addition, #Outlander trended (was one of the top ten things being talked about on Twitter) numerous times during NY ComicCon.  Starz Summer 2014 New Series: ‘Power’ and ‘Outlander’

It is apparent the size and fervency of the Outlander fan base has already been noticed and its impact noted. One example is the recent Twitter trending event held on May 19 for #WorldWideTVNeedsOutlander. The tag trended globally and the fact was highlighted in the introduction of Outlander during the L.A. Screenings event for international TV buyers that same day. You can see Diana Gabaldon author of the bestselling Outlander series of novels — tweet about that here:

Continue reading

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How to Speak Outlander: Lesson 9 ‘Tùlach Àrd’

Happy Monday Outlanders! Starz has given us a sparkling new ‘How to Speak Outlander” video this afternoon. This video focuses on ‘Tùlach Àrd’, the war cry of the Clan MacKenzie.  After a most spirited introduction and pronunciation by Àdhamh (is it just me or does he just get better and better in front of the camera with every new video), we are forced to recognize yet again that the Gàidhlig language is full of traps for the unwary learner.  For English speakers like me, ‘ard’ on paper does not logically translate to ‘aarsd’ in pronunciation, but I have learned to not be too phased by this. (See previous comments regarding H’s in Gàidhlig)

Luckily, we are treated to the MacKenzie brothers (Gary Lewis and Graham McTavish) giving us their rendition of the Clan war cry as well. And may I take a moment to compliment Terry Moore (@outlandercostum) once again for such a lovely job with everything we have seen so far costume wise. As have all the others I’ve seen, the costumes for Column and Dougal take my breath away.

In this new video, viewers are also given a glimpse into the humor of Gary Lewis as he very helpfully points out that the large chap (Graham as Dougal) will be uttering the war cry as he asks for another glass of the Rhenish. I can so totally believe Gary is the prankster on set.

And last but not least, I can’t help but get a little thrill at the end of the video when the premiere date of August 9, 2014 is shown. So close and yet so far!

 

How to Speak Outlander: Lesson 9 ‘Tùlach Àrd’