Updated 6/10/2015 – Outlander Episode 209 – Je Suis Prest – All the Gàidhlig Bits I Could Decipher

What a beautiful episode! The Scottish scenery was breathtaking as always, but for me, what truly added another dimension to this episode was the spectacular score by Bear McCreary. The haunting songs, some familiar and some new, really brought home to me to reality of the task Jamie and Claire were taking on.  And in terms of Gaelic, almost all the Gaelic this episode was in the music other than a few stray Sassenach and Mo nighean donn endearments. (If I’ve missed something else in the dialog, let me know!)  Therefore, this post is going to concentrate on the lyrics and background of the Gaelic songs used by Bear McCreary this week.

Edit: someone did point out that there was a new Gaelic phrase that Jamie used with the men at one point. I believe that is ‘a’ mhór-fhaiche’ (the great field), one of the Fraser battle cries.

Further edit: Here are more details on the other Gaelic words/phrases used this week. Thanks to all those who pointed them out while I was so taken with the music. 😉

17:28 Jamie to the marching men

Stadaibh! – Stop!

20:07 Jamie and the men give the Fraser battle cry

a’ mhór-fhaiche – Fraser Battle cry that roughly translates to ‘the great field’. Prounounced /ə VORE EYEch/

20:12 Dougal and the MacKenzies

Tulach Ard – MacKenszie battle cry that translates to ‘the high hill’.

26:58 Jamie to one of the men

a-rithist – again

38:22 Jamie to Claire

Mo nighean donn – My brown-haired lass

49:53 Jamie as Dougal leaves

siud – that/yes

I should note that I had some help in gathering this information from Bear’s tweet, as well as from CompuServe member AlexL who tracked down a lot of this information and was happy for me to share it!

An Fhìdeag Airgid

Many of you may recognize this as song used in season one of Outlander and sung by Gwyllyn the Bard (played by Gillebrìde MacMillan) in episode 103 – Rent. You can find that version, which does not contain any reference to the Prince, on volume 2 of the season 1 Outlander soundtrack, also available on Spotify.

 

Lyrics: English Translation:
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid Who will play the silver whistle?
Sèist: Chorus (after each verse):
Ho ro hu a hu il o Ho ro hu a hu il o
Hi ri hu o, hi ri hu o Hi ri hu o, hi ri hu o
Mac mo righ air tighinn a dh’Alba Since the son of my king has come to Scotland
Air lang mhar nar tri chrann airgid On a great ship with three masts of silver
Air long riomhach nam ball airgid On the handsome vessel with the silver rigging
Tearlach og nan gorm shuil mealach Young Charles with the blue bewitching eyes
Failte, failte mian is clui dhuit Welcome, welcome, may you be desired and famous
Fidhleireachd is ragha a’uil dhuit May there be fiddling and the choicest music before you
Co a sheinneadh? Nach seinninn fhin i? Who’d play it? Who’d say that I’d not play it myself?
Co a sheinneas an fhideag airigid Who will play the silver whistle?
Source: http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/matheson/anfhideag.htm

Moch sa mhadainn ’s mi dùsgadh (also called Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa – Song to the Prince)

This is the haunting song that is played during the drill scenes and at the end on the approach to the Prince’s camp to such devastating effect. This is what Bear had to say on Twitter:

 

 

I have had the pleasure of hearing Griogair Labhruidh perform live and he is a brilliant musician. I can also definitely say that I will be pre-ordering the Outlander season 2 soundtrack as soon as it is available based solely upon my desire to have this one song alone.

Lyrics: English Translation:
Sèist: Chorus (after each verse):
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh Early as I awaken
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire Great my joy, loud my laughter
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa Since I heard that the Prince comes
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill To the land of Clanranald
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa Since I heard that the Prince comes
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill To the land of Clanranald
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich Here’s a health to thy returning
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich Here’s a health to thy returning
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh His the royal blood unmingled
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire Great the modesty in his visage
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh His the royal blood unmingled
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire Great the modesty in his visage
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle With nobility overflowing
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur And endowed with all good nature
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle With nobility overflowing
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur And endowed with all good nature
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist And shouldst thou return ever
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite At his post would be each laird
Source: http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm

When researching this song, I stumbled across a fascinating video about the author of the original poetry the song is based upon.   The dialogue in the video is in Gaelic but a written English translation is available on the LearnGaelic web site. I find seeing the Gaelic and English transcription as I’m watching to be an excellent way to learn Gaelic words and sounds.

 

I hope you enjoy this look behind two of the Gaelic songs used to such effect by Bear McCreary this week!

28 thoughts on “Updated 6/10/2015 – Outlander Episode 209 – Je Suis Prest – All the Gàidhlig Bits I Could Decipher

  1. I found a video of this song Moch ‘sa’Mhadainn is Mi Dusgadh. Sung by James Campbell of Kintail in Scots Gaelic on spotify . If u will email me I ll give u the link or u can go there urself

  2. Before Jamie does his speech to the troops, he says something right before he says halt, but I can’t tell what exactly it is. I think it’s Gàidhlig.

    And after Jamie tells Dougal that he’s going to be doing sentry duty while they’re raiding the British camp, I believe he says Sìud but I could be wrong.

    • the first one is ‘stadaibh’ – ‘stop!’ (plural)

      the second one, i’m almost certain, is ‘siud’, yes.

  3. Thanks, Mandy (especially for the transcription/translation of Moch ‘s’a Mhadainn.) I think Griogair was in Glasgow that night we all met up at the Hunterian then went on to Sutherlands.

  4. Pingback: Outlander Episode 209 – Je Suis Prest – All the Gàidhlig Bits I Could Decipher – serendipity205

    • I’ve been looking for that too. Closest I found is rìoghachd bUT would love to know the right word and meaning!

      • Hi Mandy! Jamie says it right as he finishes his big speech to the men and says “I ken we will win” and then he draws his sword and says the word. Then the men say it back to him. Then right after that Dougal and his men storm down yelling Tulach Ard. Thanks so much for looking for it! 🙂

  5. Pingback: A True Fan’s Review of Outlander Ep. 209: JE SUIS PREST | Candida's Musings

  6. There are 4 gaelic words jamie says. can you translate them?The first is when he gives the speech to the men right before he says Halt. The second is during the speech when he raises his sword. It sounds like a battle cry. Vor Rika I have no idea how that is spelled. The third is when dougals men do the highland change and jamie yells something at the men he gave the speech too. The fourth is right before the commando raid.
    There is more gaelic when dougals new recruits leave and jamie dismisses dougals men. The men say something quietly in gaelic as they are leaving.

    • You just have to love Gaelic. a’ mhor-fhaiche would be pronounced /ah vor-aicka/ Forget anything you know about how letters sound in English. 😉 I’m pretty positive that is it. It’s the Fraser war cry and it would make sense in the context. I’m watching again now though.

      • I did wonder about that too, because in the books the Fraser war cry is “Caisteal Dhuni” but as you say, and according to Wiki the second war cry is “A Mhòr-fhaiche” and means the Great Field. I know mh is a V sound and it’s not surprising that the fh isn’t pronounced given all the other sounds aren’t what you’d expect, terribly difficult language to learn.

  7. Also saw Griogair live on Cape Breton. Anyone know where we can purchase the song from the je suis preste that he sings? I think his rendition is the best.

  8. jpatton@gemgravure.com

    It is on the season two soundtrack but is sung by someone else. Was hoping to get Griogair’s version.

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